Canlyniadau chwilio

1 - 9 of 9 for "wilkinson"

1 - 9 of 9 for "wilkinson"

  • teulu BACON, iron-masters and colliery proprietors . Guest and Wilkinson. He also leased some land direct from the earl of Plymouth; on this he erected a blast furnace in addition to that at Cyfarthfa. Three years later (1 July 1780) he acquired the lease of the Hirwaun iron-works, with liberty to raise iron-ore or coal from the common of Hirwaun Wrgan. In 1775 the War of American Independence broke out; this necessitated a great increase in the
  • teulu EDISBURY Bedwal, Marchwiel, Pentre-clawdd, Erddig, This Cheshire family, descended from Wilkin de Edisbury, first appears in Denbighshire c. 1544, when RICHARD WILKINSON, alias EDISBURY, held lands in Bedwal. His younger son, ROBERT WILKINSON EDISBURY (died 1610), extended the estate by marriage with Jane, daughter of Kenrick ap Howel of Stryt yr Hwch, Marchwiel. Their son, KENRICK EDISBURY (died 1638), entered the service of the Navy Board
  • GRESHAM, COLIN ALASTAIR (1913 - 1989), archaeologist, historian and author when or why they moved there. However, by 1836 Colin and his younger brother, William, had established a small company at 23 Brown Street, Salford. They were described then as ‘Engineers, machine makers and millwrights’. In 1852 a partnership was forged between Colin Mather and William Wilkinson Platt, Salford. Indeed, the foundations of the engineering firm which later became known internationally
  • HOWELLS, GERAINT WYN (Baron Geraint), (1925 - 2004), farmer and politician British Wool Marketing Board from 1966 to 1987, and as vice-chairman from 1971 to 1983; he was also the chairman of Wool Producers of Wales Ltd from 1977 to 1987. He was renowned for his large flock of Speckled Faces Sheep. From 1966, he was the managing director of meat wholesaler, Wilkinson and Steiner, in Manchester. As President of the Royal Welsh Agricultural Society, he welcomed the Queen to the
  • HUGHES, MICHAEL (1752 - 1825), industrialist Robert Peel. After the year 1797 he was buying land on an extensive scale, whilst from 1803 to 1806 he was engaged in building Sherdley House and in agricultural improvements. A very busy man — he was the partner of Thomas Williams in some of that very busy man's many concerns, and the friend of John Wilkinson — he managed also to find time to be one of the most active magistrates in the S. Helens area
  • ROBERTSON, HENRY (1816 - 1888), civil engineer and railway pioneer by his report that they gave him support and so, in company with Robert Roy and other Scotsmen, he revived the Brymbo Iron Works and pits of John Wilkinson and gave new life to a decaying industrial area in Denbighshire. Robertson realised that if the iron-works and collieries were to be run successfully, a railway to the district was essential. He and his friends, therefore, promoted the North
  • SPEED, GARY ANDREW (1969 - 2011), footballer the First Division championship, the last season before the advent of the Premiership era. The heart of the team crowned champions of England was the formidable midfield quartet of Gary on the left flank, the Scottish pair Gordon Strachan and Gary McAllister, and the combative local boy David Batty, and Gary was the one named by manager Howard Wilkinson as his player of the season. That championship
  • WILKINSON, JOHN (1728 - 1808), ‘father of the iron trade’ John was the eldest son of ISAAC WILKINSON, a Cumbrian iron worker turned master in a small way. He was born at Clifton, Cumb., in 1728, and educated at the Dissenting Academy of Caleb Rotheram at Kendal. After working with his father from c. 1748 he found employment in Midland iron-works and himself established furnaces there in which coal was successfully used to displace charcoal. When, in
  • WILKINSON, (c.1744 - 1808) - gweler ,